Category Archives: “Just Nancy”

COVID-19 Guide for Google Ads: When to Restart Your Google Ads Program

Our new series COVID-19 Guide for Google Ads starts today.  In this article we will discuss when is it time to restart Google Ads.

We recommend assuring that you are following your county and state guidelines first. If your state has not opened up businesses in your sector, it is not time to restart your Google Ads program yet.

That being said, if you feel that you may be losing traction against competitors that are opening, we have done for some clients “warm up” ad text. By adding “we will be open on such and such a date and are taking virtual consultations or pre-bookings”, you can start to drive your website traffic and meet demand.

We have found for many plastic surgery practices that there is so much pent-up demand that conversions are blowing through the roof when a Google Ads restart is done.

For other businesses, demand is not the issue, but rather cash flow to restart Google Ads really is the issue. In this case, we recommend chatting with your account manager to see if you can start with a smaller footprint and lower negotiated management fee.

For those that have not stopped Google Ads programs during the virus – like ecommerce and service-based businesses, activity on Google Ads is good. For some very good. Even pest control firms are reporting excellent lead generation these past months.

If you have worried about what to do with Google Ads and COVID-19, now’s the time to review what strategies your Google Ads Manager may suggest.

For our own clients who have paused programs during the virus, we encourage you to get with us for a custom plan on how to get back going with Google Ads. We know that we will be able to find a business-friendly way to assist you in driving traffic again and getting the leads you need to move forward from Google Ads exposure.

 

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Important Announcement on Business and the Coronavirus

Dear Clients,

Many of you are having business affected by Covid-19 or the coronavirus this month.

We wanted to let you know that if you ask us to pause your Google Ads account and stop Google Ads management services, we will process a credit memo to your account for the unused time for the month. You will receive a copy of the credit memo at the end of the month with your statement.

When you restart our services, we will apply that credit to your month’s management fee.

Should you have a greater impact and not restart services within three months, we will mail you a check for your credit.

We do encourage you to sign up to receive our blog post notices by email using Feedburner (on the home page of our blog on the top left where it says “get our articles by email”). This way when we have additional announcements you will receive them in your inbox.

In the meantime, stay safe and be healthy.

Sincerely,

Nancy McCord

 

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How to Move Your Website to SSL

Many website owners are getting approached by their hosts to move from http to https. What is important to know is that there is an easy way to do this and a hard way.

Here are my tips to easily move from http to https

Typically I will recommend that you buy your SSL certificate through your web host. Although it may be slightly more expensive, when you use your host’s provider your host is eager to help you set up your SSL cert correctly.

I paid $199 for my SSL certificate which is renewable each year through my web host. Once you have purchase the certificate, your host take over the installation on your server. For most clients this is all that needs to be done. Everything should work yet be under the green padlock and your site should start with https.

I do recommend that if you do move to SSL that you have your webmaster review your website files to assure that there are no hard coded in page links within your website referencing http. If there are, you will want them to change them to https.

Also if you are running WordPress in a directory on your site, you will want to update your logins and locations so that your blog and the blog access control panel are now all https.

Last of all do not forget to update the links in Google Ads. Change your site links and ad URLs to https to complete the project.

One tip, I typically recommend moving to https before you do a website redesign. There is nothing worse than having to troubleshoot server issues for https while you are troubleshooting a new site launch. Don’t do these updates at the same time.

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The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) Takes Effect January 1, 2020 – What to Know

The California Consumer Privacy Act or CCPA which was enacted in 2018 takes effect January 1, 2020.

Here’s what the new bill says:

The California Constitution grants a right of privacy. Existing law provides for the confidentiality of personal information in various contexts and requires a business or person that suffers a breach of security of computerized data that includes personal information, as defined, to disclose that breach, as specified.
This bill would enact the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018. Beginning January 1, 2020, the bill would grant a consumer a right to request a business to disclose the categories and specific pieces of personal information that it collects about the consumer, the categories of sources from which that information is collected, the business purposes for collecting or selling the information, and the categories of 3rd parties with which the information is shared.
The bill would require a business to make disclosures about the information and the purposes for which it is used. The bill would grant a consumer the right to request deletion of personal information and would require the business to delete upon receipt of a verified request, as specified.
The bill would grant a consumer a right to request that a business that sells the consumer’s personal information, or discloses it for a business purpose, disclose the categories of information that it collects and categories of information and the identity of 3rd parties to which the information was sold or disclosed.
The bill would require a business to provide this information in response to a verifiable consumer request. The bill would authorize a consumer to opt out of the sale of personal information by a business and would prohibit the business from discriminating against the consumer for exercising this right, including by charging the consumer who opts out a different price or providing the consumer a different quality of goods or services, except if the difference is reasonably related to value provided by the consumer’s data.
The bill would authorize businesses to offer financial incentives for collection of personal information. The bill would prohibit a business from selling the personal information of a consumer under 16 years of age, unless affirmatively authorized, as specified, to be referred to as the right to opt in.
The bill would prescribe requirements for receiving, processing, and satisfying these requests from consumers. The bill would prescribe various definitions for its purposes and would define “personal information” with reference to a broad list of characteristics and behaviors, personal and commercial, as well as inferences drawn from this information. The bill would prohibit the provisions described above from restricting the ability of the business to comply with federal, state, or local laws, among other things.
The bill would provide for its enforcement by the Attorney General, as specified, and would provide a private right of action in connection with certain unauthorized access and exfiltration, theft, or disclosure of a consumer’s nonencrypted or nonredacted personal information, as defined.
The bill would prescribe a method for distribution of proceeds of Attorney General actions. The bill would create the Consumer Privacy Fund in the General Fund with the moneys in the fund, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to be applied to support the purposes of the bill and its enforcement.
The bill scheduled to take effect January 1, 2020, is similar in nature to the GDPR which the EU put into effect this past year to protect the rights of citizens’ and impacts website worldwide that have EU visitors. Even if a business does not sell products or services in the EU they should be GDPR compliant.
In the California bill on the CCPA the impact is similar and protects California residents on website even if the website does not sell or provide services in California.
Sage recommends:
Considering that many US and even worldwide businesses ship products to California, or have online properties like websites that are available to Californians, a significant number of businesses will need to make timely preparations, and ensure ongoing compliant processes are in place. Read the full article.
For most small businesses, they will not need to change their online marketing due to this new act, as it mainly effects businesses with over $25 million in revenue or those that are in business to sell site visitors’ personal information.
That being said, the minimum implementation that a website should use at this time is the GDPR which is the privacy protection for the EU. Most clients we work with do not fit into the category that will be impacted by the new CCPA law.
It is important to understand that privacy laws are changing and that consumers now require websites, that they visit, to be more transparent as to what the site does with their personal information and who they share it with.
To me, this seems like a great time to review your business policies about privacy and to update your own website’s posted privacy policy to meet these new consumer expectations and laws.
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